Here’s where you can keep up to date regarding station business, program changes, and other tidbits in the life of your community radio station.

KPFZ Website Update (Hacked again)

Alan Fletcher (Web Master)
07/01/2016

This website has been hacked again, and the new website is not yet operational.

We are therefore going to update the present site … so it may be down intermittently. (And at worst we may have to restore it from backups if the upgrade doesn’t go smoothly).

Monthly Board of Directors Meeting on July 20, 2016

Ellen H (Editor in Chief)
06/27/2016

The Board Of Directors meeting is scheduled for Wednesday, July 20, 2016 at 6:15 p.m. Board members will meet upstairs in the KPFZ office at 149 North Main Street in Lakeport. The public is always encouraged and welcome to attend.

Please check in with this website or the KPFZ station at 707-263-3640 for meeting agendas and any updates.

Mark your calendars! See you there.

Future meeting – August 17, 2016 at 6:15 p.m.

Online Streaming Ended on January 31st

Ellen H (Editor in Chief)
02/05/2016

KPFZ Management has announced that online streaming ended on January 31, 2016.  According to the KPFZ Board of Directors President Chloe Karl station staff are currently exploring other avenues to restore online streaming.

If you do want to help prevent this to happen, check out the Future of Music Coalition’s post on www.actionnetwork.org. This is an organization attempting to get reasonable webcasting fees that will not force small community radio stations like KPFZ to stop streaming their shows.

From the Future of Music Colation’s post on Action Network’s website:

We support fair and transparent payment to artists and rightsholders when their work is used. We also recognize that small webcasters are vitally important to musical culture, whether it’s small community FM stations or online webcasters who program niche music. Webcasting reflects far greater diversity—from cutting edge releases by contemporary artists to America’s rich and varied musical traditions. And unlike commercial FM, internet radio pays musicians and labels. The relationship between artists and small webcasters is mutually supportive. This dynamic must be preserved. The expiration of the Webcaster Settlement Act has left many small webcasters facing a steep increase in rates and unsure of their future survival. We’re optimistic that a solution can be found to allow many small commercial webcasters to continue to operate, important music played and artists paid—directly, transparently and fairly. Stay tuned for updates and opportunities to take action. For now, please sign up to be notified of the latest developments.